[SISEA 1990] Paper: Tony Robbin – Quasi Crystals for Architecture

ABSTRACT

The big news in patterns is that there exists a wholly different class of patterns –Quasicrystals. Two dimensional quasicrystals, often called Penrose Tessellation after Roger Penrose who discovered them in the mid 1970’s, are made 11g on only two shapes or “tiles” – a fat and a skinny rhombus. Three dimensional quasicrystals -made up of a fat and a skinny rhombohedra-are only a few years old. What is new about them, what has escaped 30,000 years of previous pattern making, is that they are non-repeating patterns. Quasicrystal patterns have astounding visual and structural properties that make them ideally suited for applications to architecture.

  • Tony Robbin, New York City,¬†USA

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